Tag Archives: the 100

The 100 and Representations of Teen Girlhood

In this podcast, Dr Jodi McAlister and I discuss teen television series The 100. Some of the topics we discuss include: Lexa’s death and queer erasure; fandom protests; the show’s diverse and refreshing representations of girlhood, as well as representations that may undermine or complicate a reading of the text as ‘progressive’; representations of girls in positions of power; and the decentralisation of romance narratives.

Download via iTunes for free: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/100-representations-teen-girlhood/id1011011620?i=365134883&mt=2

Or listen right here on the blog:

Virginity Loss Narratives on the Teen Screen

https://teenscreenfeminism.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/virginitylosstsfpodcast.mp3

This week’s podcast discusses the trope of virginity loss in girls’ coming-of-age narratives. We discuss the history of virginity loss narratives, and how they have become so entwined in how our culture thinks about girls’ worth, value, and sexuality. Jodi McAlister and I discussed: what “counts” as virginity loss within a culture organised according to adult patriarchal agendas and desires? Where does girls’ pleasure figure into this paradigm? And are there any shifts occurring in narratives about girls and virginity, particularly in film and television towards another way of thinking about female bodies, sex, and pleasure?

You can now access the podcast via iTunes for free here: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/virginity-loss-narratives/id1011011620?i=346334467&mt=2

 

Fantasy as a Site of Resistance and Possibility: A Podcast with Jodi McAlister

In this podcast, Jodi McAlister and I talk about fantasy and fantasising as a site for resistance and possibility for women viewers and readers. Some of the ideas we explore include: can fantasy open up a space for transgressive desire and imagining alternatives to the status quo? How do narratives like heterosexual romances, which may initially appear conservative, become the grounds for this kind of imagining? How do texts about girls open up new ways of ‘doing girlhood’? And how can we explore fantasy through a feminist lens, and for a feminist agenda?

Texts we discuss in this podcast include: Reign, The 100, Veronica Mars, The Vampire Diaries, Outlander, Fifty Shades of Grey, Obernewtyn, and Buffy. Tune in and let us know your thoughts!

FantasyandResistancePodcast

https://teenscreenfeminism.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/fantasyandresistancepodcast.mov

Download this podcast for free on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/fantasy-as-site-resistance/id1011011620?i=345426736&mt=2

TW: this podcast discusses the representation of rape and violence against women in Reign and Outlander

Girl Leaders, Authority, and Power on “The 100”

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Clarke and Lexa lead the way into battle in “The 100”

Dominant cultural constructions of girlhood require girls to fall into line with adult regulations and authority, and closely monitor girls for any deviations from this conformity. Therefore, narratives like The 100 that provide a counter discourse to this are important for a feminist reading of the teen screen, and its potential to articulate an oppositional politics of girlhood. Representations of violent, brutal girls often pathologise the adolescent as a dangerous deviant who has strayed too far from the path of her ‘proper’ place. If we examine adult, patriarchal discourses of girlhood, we find that girls are constructed as ideal objects, passive, non-confrontational, agreeable, gentle, and kind. So it makes sense that representations that deviate from this stiflingly sexist norm often pathologise this deviation as an abnormality, a failure of the girl to fulfil her role within the carefully demarcated boundaries of feminine acculturation. This character is often either a) destroyed at the conclusion of the narrative to restore ‘proper’ order or b) restored to her original position within the patriarchal order.

The 100 provides an exciting alternative to this narrative. Heroines Clarke and Lexa are represented as strong and fearless leaders, and their authority is never truly questioned or undermined by adult male characters. When they give orders, they are simply followed. When they are violent, or brutal, or make decisions that are unemotional and strategic, it is a given that they will continue to be respected. Other heroines of The 100, particularly Octavia and Raven, are also figures of non-compliance, extraordinary power, intelligence, and bravery. The fact that these violent, fierce, defiant girls are not condemned or shamed but celebrated as worthy heroines is truly incredible to me. Their decisions are complicated, and they don’t make excuses for the often-brutal effects of their actions. Non-apologetic girls, girls who do not repent for their lack of conformity to adult male rule, dominate this teen show. This is key to the show’s feminist politics, because it ruptures the dominant discourse of girlhood outlined above. Within this space of rupture, the field of girlhood and what it is able to represent expands. This is central to a feminist reading of the teen screen because, for me, our role as feminist critics and theorists is to locate points within culture where girlhood can be thought about, experienced, and done in new and potentially empowering ways. Instead of following the rules of feminine adolescence enforced by adult, patriarchal governance, the imaginative space of The 100 represents girls leading the way into new territories of girlhood, carving out a space for potential alternatives to the dominant system.